Archive for the 'Philosophy' Category

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What is a human and what is humanity? Hosted by Magdalena Smieszek, this episode of the How We Are Human podcast is part 3 of the discussion with Maria Kronfeldner, Professor in the Philosophy Department at the Central European University, and three Master's students, Olesya Bondarenko, Noha Hendi, and Rachel Sanderoff, as part of the course entitled Topics in the Philosophy of the Human and Social Sciences (ToPHSS).

The discussion considers the different ways that the question about the human can be asked, how we can delineate between human properties, relations, and other aspects of the human. We consider how different societies approach the question of what is a human, humanity and human nature, whether from the religious or the scientific discourse. Finally, we reflect on whether the category of human as a historical construct will disappear, and what the subsequent constructs will mean for the relations between humans, humane treatment and human rights.

The ToPHSS course was funded by the CEU Humanities Initiative. The podcast was created by Magdalena Smieszek with the support of the CEU Centre for Media, Data and Society as part of the AudioFiles Project funded by the Intellectual Themes Initiative.

 

Music: Reaktion by Carbon Based Lifeforms

 

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Do we know ourselves better biologically or socially? Hosted by Magdalena Smieszek, this episode of the How We Are Human podcast is part 2 of the discussion with Maria Kronfeldner, Professor in the Philosophy Department at the Central European University, and three Master's students Olesya Bondarenko, Noha Hendi, and Rachel Sanderoff, as part of the course entitled Topics in the Philosophy of the Human and Social Sciences (ToPHSS).

The discussion continues to consider how humans understand themselves, the separation of cultures within the natural and social sciences, as well as the implications for knowledge and even politics. The conversation touches on how the theological understanding of the human connects with the human sciences. In discussing whether there can be a unified concept of the human, the agreement is that that there are different ways of connecting and unifying, and a continual contestation and negotiation is part of that process of agreeing on what we mean when it comes to the varied conceptualizations about humans. We can be guided both by what science tells us about human nature but also how we envision ourselves, and how these concepts come together in considering the facts and making decisions about what is essential for us. This involves bridging the divisions between knowledge coming from the West and East in a number of areas, including human rights discourse.

The ToPHSS course was funded by the CEU Humanities Initiative. The podcast was created by Magdalena Smieszek with the support of the CEU Centre for Media, Data and Society as part of the AudioFiles Project funded by the Intellectual Themes Initiative.

Music: Ocean of Joy by Sudaya

 

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How do we humans study the human? Hosted by Magdalena Smieszek, this episode of the How We Are Human podcast presents a discussion with Maria Kronfeldner, Professor in the Philosophy Department at the Central European University, and three Master's students, Olesya Bondarenko, Noha Hendi, and Rachel Sanderoff, as part of the course entitled Topics in the Philosophy of the Human and Social Sciences (ToPHSS).

The discussion considers how concepts travel between scientific disciplines and philosophy in the study of the human. A focus is placed on the interaction between facts and values within the scientific findings as well as communication of the findings to the public. The outcome is that science and society influence each other, through communication of science and its connection with everyday language. Some examples are discussed, namely the study of rape and aggression within disciplines such as evolutionary psychology, and how the social and biological aspects of human behaviour are interlinked. Categorizations of humans, such as categories of race and sex, are also considered in terms of their social and biological sources. Finally, the discussion reflects on what it means to think of ourselves as biological beings, the emancipatory as well as potentially discriminatory elements. This leads to reflection on the interaction of the biological understanding of the human with the social environment.

The ToPHSS course was funded by the CEU Humanities Initiative. The podcast was created by Magdalena Smieszek with the support of the CEU Centre for Media, Data and Society as part of the AudioFiles Project funded by the Intellectual Themes Initiative.

 

Music: Elements by Marc Burt

 

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